July 27, 2012
nevver:

Paradise lost

nevver:

Paradise lost

(via mrmanager)

7:35pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZCeoZyQENUyV
  
Filed under: map U.S. history 
July 27, 2012
nypl:

The Deerstalker: Where Sherlock Holmes’ Popular Image Came From, via Smithsonian Magazine.
An interesting read, and a similar theme to an upcoming exhibition at NYPL, which will focus on how Dickens’ characters have been portrayed visually over the years.

You’d think the NY Public Library would know this, but Sherlock Holmes was created by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, not Charles Dickens. You might want to edit the original post.

nypl:

The Deerstalker: Where Sherlock Holmes’ Popular Image Came From, via Smithsonian Magazine.

An interesting read, and a similar theme to an upcoming exhibition at NYPL, which will focus on how Dickens’ characters have been portrayed visually over the years.

You’d think the NY Public Library would know this, but Sherlock Holmes was created by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, not Charles Dickens. You might want to edit the original post.

June 4, 2012

theatlantic:

In Focus: Remembering Tiananmen Square 

Top: A Chinese man stands alone to block a line of tanks heading east on Beijing’s Cangan Boulevard in Tiananmen Square, on on June 5, 1989. The man, calling for an end to violence and bloodshed against pro-democracy demonstrators, was pulled away by bystanders, and the tanks continued on their way.

Center-left: Workmen try to drape the portrait of Mao Tse-tung in Beijing’s Tiananmen Square after it was pelted with paint, on May 23, 1989.

Center-right: Bodies of dead civilians lie among crushed bicycles near Beijing’s Tiananmen Square, on June 4, 1989.

Bottom: Three unidentified men flee as a Chinese man, background left, stands alone to block a line of approaching tanks, in Beijing’s Tiananmen Square, on June 5, 1989. The man in the background stood his ground and blocked the column of tanks when they came closer, an image captured on film by numerous other photographers and one that ultimately became a widely reproduced symbol of events there.

See more. [Images: AP, Reuters]

23 years ago today, the Chinese People’s Liberation Army violently cleared Beijing’s Tiananmen Square of protesters, ending a six-week demonstration that had called for democracy and widespread political reform. The protests began in April of 1989, gaining support as initial government reactions included concessions. Martial law was declared on May 20, troops were mobilized, and from the night of June 3 through the early morning of June 4, the PLA pushed into Tiananmen Square, crushing some protesters and firing on many others.

The exact number killed may never be known, but estimates range from several hundred to several thousand. Today, China’s censors are blocking Internet access to the terms “six four,” “23,” “candle,” and “never forget,” broadening extensive efforts to silence talk about the 23rd anniversary of China’s bloody June 4 crackdown. Here is that story, in images and words. Please share it widely.

April 24, 2012
Poor Richard's Almanac: Why did I switch?

richard-saunders:

A very conservative friend of mine came up to me after a political discussion in my economics class, and said: “Why did you switch? I heard at one point that you were a Republican, and now you really call yourself a liberal or progressive. Why did you switch?”

I gave him some apolitical response…

I often wonder why people switch their political affiliations, and this offers some good insight into being on the side of progressives. Nice post.

(via richard-saunders-deactivated201)

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